Grammy-nominated Maxi Priest Reveals Saxon Sound System Connection in Sound Chat Radio Interview

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soundradioThere are exciting things brewing for the Sound Chat Radio digital network! The latest buzzing addition is an interview with Grammy-nominated Reggae artist Maxi Priest. In the riveting exclusive, the music giant reveals his obscure history with UK’s famed Saxon sound system.

Maxi Priest tells of his early days on the legendary Saxon sound system, which even consisted of the burgeoning talent stealing wood to build his own speaker boxes. Yes, you heard correctly.

Further, the world-renowned artist goes on to declare that “speed rapping” started in the UK on Saxon sound, despite Jamaican artists long running accounts of Jamaica birthing the phenomenal art form. In this uber enlightening interview, Maxi Priest shares many other little-known details of his Saxon connection.

Robust with Reggae, Dancehall and Sound System driven shows, features and more have graced Sound Chat Radio for nearly a decade. Its official subscription based website soundchatradio.com, launched by visionary Garfield “Chin” Bourne in September 2020, houses a treasure trove of content with other explosive features including super producer Bobby Digital’s last sound system interview before his death; Reggae crossover stars Tanto Metro and Wayne Wonder; the intriguing history of Brooklyn’s champion sound LP International; and much more! Although access to exclusives and archival content is subscription based, free radio shows are available during their airtime.

It’s genuinely an exciting time for Maxi Priest who raked in a 2020 “Best Reggae Album” Grammy nomination for his album “It All Comes Back to Love.” He joins an amazing ensemble of nominees including The Wailers (“One World”), Toots and the Maytals (“Got to Be Tough”), Skip Marley (“Higher Place”) and Buju Banton (“Upside Down”).

Visit:
https://www.soundchatradio.com

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The sound of Reggae is widely recognised because of its acoustically formed bass and drum downbeat, and its offbeat rhythm section. With such a diversity in style it is also considered complex enough to attract progressively minded musicians. A music that has a strong association with dance covering a variety of styles while also offering a background beat for those sharing Biblical chants of Zion. It is hard to ignore Reggae’s influence and how it interacts with our day-to-day lives. Shared as background music for films and advertising driving its heavy bass lines literally felt wherever rock and pop are played. Reggae has an affinity with mainstream British pop; recognised within the hip-hop culture and considered “cool” by those with no connection to Jamaica. As lovers of reggae my aim is to build a community of reggae followers that can share thoughts, news, events as listeners, artists, DJ’s and hosts.